Best Quotes from Peter Thiel’s Zero To One!

Peter Thiel Best Quotes from Zero To One

Peter Thiel is an inspiration to many. He might not be as enigmatic as Elon Musk but the PayPal co-founder certainly has a mind to understand the next big thing in tech. The proof of his understanding of technology is his early investment in Facebook most of which he took out once Facebook was listed on the stock market.

Peter Thiel’s Zero to One is revered as one of the first books that any startup founder or an aspiring entrepreneur should read. While we do recommend everyone to go ahead and read the book, here are some of the key quotes from the book that will further strengthen our claim of how well Peter Thiel understands the startup world.

ZERO TO ONE EVERY MOMENT IN BUSINESS happens only once. The next Bill Gates will not build an operating system. The next Larry Page or Sergey Brin won’t make a search engine. And the next Mark Zuckerberg won’t create a social network. If you are copying these guys, you aren’t learning from them.

Brilliant thinking is rare, but courage is in even shorter supply than genius.

Customers won’t care about any particular technology unless it solves a particular problem in a superior way. And if you can’t monopolize a unique solution for a small market, you’ll be stuck with vicious competition.

The best entrepreneurs know this: every great business is built around a secret that’s hidden from the outside. A great company is a conspiracy to change the world; when you share your secret, the recipient becomes a fellow conspirator.

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If your product requires advertising or salespeople to sell it, it’s not good enough: technology is primarily about product development, not distribution.

By the time a student gets to college, he’s spent a decade curating a bewilderingly diverse resume to prepare for a completely unknowable future. Come what may, he’s ready–for nothing in particular.

Today’s “best practices” lead to dead ends; the best paths are new and untried.

CREATIVE MONOPOLY means new products that benefit everybody and sustainable profits for the creator. Competition means no profits for anybody, no meaningful differentiation, and a struggle for survival.

Tolstoy opens Anna Karenina by observing: “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.” Business is the opposite. All happy companies are different: each one earns a monopoly by solving a unique problem. All failed companies are the same: they failed to escape competition.

Even in engineering-driven Silicon Valley, the buzzwords of the moment call for building a “lean startup” that can “adapt” and “evolve” to an ever-changing environment. Would-be entrepreneurs are told that nothing can be known in advance: we’re supposed to listen to what customers say they want, make nothing more than a “minimum viable product,” and iterate our way to success. But leanness is a methodology, not a goal. Making small changes to things that already exist might lead you to a local maximum, but it won’t help you find the global maximum. You could build the best version of an app that lets people order toilet paper from their iPhone. But iteration without a bold plan won’t take you from 0 to 1. A company is the strangest place of all for an indefinite optimist: why should you expect your own business to succeed without a plan to make it happen? Darwinism may be a fine theory in other contexts, but in startups, intelligent design works best.

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